Warning by PSNI, beware of email scam

The caution has been issued by the PSNI over an email scam which grips the aim to obtain delicate data form victims, such as banking details and credentials.

They said fraudsters have been sending phishing emails to addresses in Northern Ireland and have asked people to be “on their guard”.

They said the emails hold a spiteful computer program known as a ‘Banking Trojan,’ in an attachment.

The cop said the subject line contains the name of the recipient and they have unveiled what the email looks like.

Here’s the sample email:

“Hi, [name]!

I am disturbing you for a very serious reason. Although we are not familiar, but I have the significant amount of individual info concerning you. The thing is that most likely mistakenly, the data of your account has been emailed to me.

For instance, your address is: [real home address]

I am a law-abiding citizen, so I decided to personal data may have been hacked. I attached the file – [surname].dot that I received, that you could explore what info has become obtainable for scammers. File password is – 2811

Best Wishes,”

Warning by PSNI, beware of email scamDet Chf Insp Ian Wilson shared the words, “The PSNI has been made aware of this scam by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau and we want to warn local people to be on their guard.”

“The emails include an attachment – a ‘.dot’ the file usually titled with the recipient’s name. This attachment is thought to contain the Banking Trojan Ursniff/Gozi, hidden within an image in the document.

“The Ursniff Banking Trojan attempts to obtain sensitive data from victims, such as banking credentials and passwords. The data is then sold on by the criminals involved to make money.”

The advice to avoid becoming a victim of the scam is:

  • Do not make click on links or open any attachments you get in unwanted emails or SMS messages: Keep that in mind that impostors can ‘deceive’ an email address to make it look like one used by someone you rely on. If you are not sure, check the email header to recognize the real source of conversation (you can find out how by searching the internet for applicable advice for your email supplier).
  • Do not allow macros in downloads; enabling macros will permit Trojan/malware to be installed onto your device/system.
  • Always install software updates as soon as they become available. Whether you are updating the operating system or an application, the update will often count fixations for dangerous security weaknesses.
  • Make usual backups of your essential data to an external hard drive, memory stick or online storage supplier. It is essential that the device you back up to is not linked to your system as any malware contagion could spread to that as well.

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