Many people are using Exchange server on MS Windows Server 2008. Everything was going fine since the last few days, when problem start appearing on the domain when it was trying to get to @sbcglobal.net account. The account was stuck in the email queue and then, it started giving an error to the users. This is a very weird issue because out of all the issues that we know could possibly come in the webmail platform, this is perhaps the most unique and different kind of issue. Here is the error that people have received while trying to access SBCGlobal net login account.

att.net email login

Possibly forged hostname for our email IP. These days, when people see errors coming from a web based service, then they don’t hit the panic button, but they instead try to resolve the issue on their own because they know the solutions are provided on the internet, and they just need to search for them. Some people have found the root cause of the problem, which is possibly a RDNS issue with the internet service provider.

The issue was confirmed alter on by experts when they personally checked their SBCGlobal net mail accounts. They also told the troubleshooting steps to those who have suffered a lot due to this issue. But, they asked some questions such as; were you able to ISP setup a PTR record for that IP address (public), from that email server from which the sending has taken place to the public FQDN of the server?

Some experts have also told to check whether the FQDN on the Send connector is matched with the PTR. Moreover, it is also important to check whether the PTR has a legitimate A record, which returns to the same IP address. Many people are facing this issue, and what most people think the reason for the occurrence of the issue is the recent change that occurred in @www SBCGlobal net because there isn’t a single email server that is rejecting emails, but all the mails are sent to @SBCGlobal.net are showing the same error, i.e., ‘possibly forged hostname’. People have proper PTR records of all their outgoing IPs

The most appropriate solution:

IPChicken from your email server to receive its IP. Do you have this IP of the mail.domain record that you are using? You will have to ping A form from WAN to mail server IP. Check if this fix mail.domain record issue or not. If it doesn’t fix that issue, then check, if it fix ISP. You will be able to know if it is ISP, which is creating the problem or the mail.domain record, and if it is ISP, then you will have to call the email help and support providers and explain them that they need to add a reverse PTR. People can also go check out SBCGlobal net email settings just in case they are skeptical about the settings.

You also have to ensure that the Firewall’s NAT policies are correct. If the NAT policy is not right, then there are chances that the outgoing IP is the Firewall. It is not there in the incoming email record.

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